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Angel69
10-09-2006, 12:37 PM
well my school district has decided to do one of these 3 suggested ideas, the students and staff are voting next week...tell me what u would rather have...

1) 4 days of school a week...but the school day will be 10 hours long

2) cut ALL extracaricular activites (sports, school clubs, after school things, ect.)

3) cut out almost all elective classes and fire 100-300 teachers.

idk what to pick :(

xtraking
10-09-2006, 12:43 PM
wtf, why are they doing that?

If i had to pick any, id pick number 1.

claustrophobia9
10-09-2006, 12:46 PM
automated courses run by college professors but the prof. is only there like once a month and just as a speaker. reg. teachers read essays and answer questions but dont teach, the text books on computer do.

vikingshadow
10-09-2006, 12:50 PM
Why would they cut all extracurricular activites? Is your district having financial problems? The firing of teachers, especially that large a group, ALWAYS ends up with negative results in a school district, and while it saves in teacher salary, not having electives do not help the overall education of the student, so I wouldn't recommend that at all.

A lot of schools are going to the 4 day week, but instead of making the day longer, they cut Spring Break or one of the other breaks short. Of course, that means that parents of younger children in school would have to find day care to cover the Friday you're not in school. Of course, with a longer school day, they save some money by not having to put the child in day care or the sitter after school, so it evens out.

It looks like if it were up to the general public, the best bet for saving money would be with the 4 day week.

durrell
10-09-2006, 03:43 PM
Number 1. 3 day weekends every weekend would be FTW.

Moe
10-09-2006, 06:30 PM
they are all dumb. financial problems much?

honestly, cut all the extra curriculars and then go run rampent in town everyday breaking stuff...they will learn that they are stupid for even suggesting that.

taurinic
10-09-2006, 07:15 PM
#2 and 3 are the most retarded choices I have ever seen. Do you know how boring the school would be without any sports and whatnot?!


If I had to do this vote, I say #1 but its pretty lame.

timmyshoota
10-09-2006, 08:25 PM
LOL, as I read this I'm writing a paper about how private school is better than public.

vikingshadow
10-10-2006, 03:50 AM
Curious - what makes private school better, in your opinion?

shunut
10-10-2006, 05:34 AM
I think that I'd have to choose #1. Extracurricular activities are important, they give you something to work toward and make students keep their grades at a decent level if they want to participate.

As for the private school is better than public, I'd have to agree. I have attended both private and public school and would have to say I received a better education at the private school.

The advantages I found at the private school was the ratio of students to teachers were way lower. My freshman year in high school there were no more that 15 students in each one of my classes. Why is that better? More one-on-one interaction with the teacher. Anytime I had a problem with something I never found that the teacher didn't have time for me.

I also found that the curriculum was way more advanced than the public schools. Stuff I was doing my freshman year (last year I attended private school) was way ahead of the public school I attended my sophomore year. Freshman year most students were taking Pre-Calculus and most Sophomores were taking Calc 1. In the public school I went to my Senior year they told me they had no other math classes to offer me because I took Calc 2 my junior year.

Another reason I think private schools were better is because I never heard of anybody in my class failing. If someone had a C, D or F, they got tutoring, period. They would have to continue tutoring until their grade improved. When I left after my freshman year I didn't know anybody with a GPA lower than a 3.0.

When I went to the public school everybody thought I was a nerd, I probably was. I was labeled that because I always studied, I always participated in class, if there was something I didn't understand I always asked about it and I always did my homework.

vikingshadow
10-10-2006, 08:40 AM
All good points!

I think that I'd have to choose #1. Extracurricular activities are important, they give you something to work toward and make students keep their grades at a decent level if they want to participate.I agree, you can't take extracurricular activities out of school. All work, no play and such...

As for the private school is better than public, I'd have to agree. I have attended both private and public school and would have to say I received a better education at the private school.

The advantages I found at the private school was the ratio of students to teachers were way lower. My freshman year in high school there were no more that 15 students in each one of my classes. Why is that better? More one-on-one interaction with the teacher. Anytime I had a problem with something I never found that the teacher didn't have time for me.

I agree with this point. Teacher to student ratio is extremely important.

I also found that the curriculum was way more advanced than the public schools. Stuff I was doing my freshman year (last year I attended private school) was way ahead of the public school I attended my sophomore year. Freshman year most students were taking Pre-Calculus and most Sophomores were taking Calc 1. In the public school I went to my Senior year they told me they had no other math classes to offer me because I took Calc 2 my junior year.

This is where I have to disagree with you. In Oklahoma, at least, there is a standard curriculum that must be followed. ALL students, even private and homeschooled students, must be able to pass the Oklahoma PASS test. The skills are gradiated per grade level, and each student must prove efficiency at each level or the school's suffer.

Now, we've found here that when kids transfer from the local private school to the public school, they are WAY behind the other students and tutoring must be provided to catch these students up. That could just be a local issue though, so I don't wish to apply this to all private schools. However, my thoughts are that this isn't an isolated case.

Another reason I think private schools were better is because I never heard of anybody in my class failing. If someone had a C, D or F, they got tutoring, period. They would have to continue tutoring until their grade improved. When I left after my freshman year I didn't know anybody with a GPA lower than a 3.0.

In a properly ran public school, the failing rate should not be so high as to notice it either. In our school, the ONLY students who fail are those who don't turn work in, or miss too much of school. We have mandatory grade checks (eligibility) every week, and those with grades that are slipping are required to attend tutoring until their grades go up. Every Friday, the parents of students with lower grades are called and informed of their students progress. If tutoring fails to work, then it's on to more intense tutoring, either in school or directly one on one with a specific teacher (per subject.) We also give teacher/student mentoring, and then there are the teachers who choose a few students just to "check up on" every day.

I think that you'll see more and more public schools moving in this direction. Especially with NCLB.

When I went to the public school everybody thought I was a nerd, I probably was. I was labeled that because I always studied, I always participated in class, if there was something I didn't understand I always asked about it and I always did my homework.

If we had more kids doing that in public school, you might see a difference in the public classroom as well. Remember though, in a lot of private schools, you get the more "priviledged" students, or the one's whose parents are very into their child's education. Public school has the students who are left out of that mix (plus those that aren't, but you get what I mean.) Also, in a private school, the teachers aren't as regulated as those in a public school. They don't have to prove they're highly qualified, and I've heard some cases where the teachers aren't even certified to teach!

I think there is good and bad in all education, including private, but the fix shouldn't be "which is better." The fix should be "How can we meet and exceed the standards to which the government has placed upon us, and how can we teach these students to achieve success in the world away from home and school?"

A lot of times, I don't think either situation helps with that...

shunut
10-10-2006, 10:31 AM
Vike I agree with you but a lot of your points are based on a perfect world.

I have to go from the examples I know. I know my education in IL and here in AZ the private school I went to was way ahead of the public schools. I'm not saying all public schools just the ones I knew people went to and the ones I went to. You are always going to have your exceptions both ways. Yes there is a curriculum that all have to stick to but there is nothing that says that the programs can't be accelerated, usually there is a requirement that needs to be met, anything above and beyond is just a bonus.

Charter schools are another example. 2 of my little sisters have attended a charter school their entire lives. Now 1 of my little sisters finished 8th grade and is now in high school. Her freshman year with the exception of English she was almost the only freshman in all of her classes because her school pushed the curriculum and accelerated everything.

Again with the failing rate you are going to have your exceptions either way. When you get up into schools with 4-5000+ kids and teachers are responsible for 600+ students, they just don't have the time to sit down with every individual. I know you are a teacher and I think its a tragedy that we hold Professional Athletes and Entertainers on such a higher pedestal than our educators. IMO the educators should be the ones negotiating multi-million dollar contracts.

I also think that parents play a big part in education and how someone learns. Parents who are involved with their kids education tend to have the students in honors classes and don't fail. I think there is an increasing number of parents who don't get involved whether they don't have the time or just don't care. Those are the students that don't do their home work, don't pay attention in class and end up failing all their classes.

pbfreak3221
10-10-2006, 11:19 AM
Our district, also toyed with the idea of a four day school week, but it eventually got voted away. I think a four day week, would not be any good. Because if the day is 10 hours long think about it, for me school starts at 8 so, we wouldn't get out till six at night. To pull that off, you would need to start school much earlier, which I don't think many students would like.

08Lud08
10-10-2006, 11:27 AM
Heres usually the problem with private schools, The more you pay the better it is. Just because its a private school doesnt mean its automatically good, Its usually better if you pay more money. Also I usually find it easier to learn with nice teachers who get involved with the class than those teachers that put assignments on the board and tell you to work. I dont like those type of teachers because the dont even teach, they just dictate whats in the book making the class boring.

colonel_moo
10-10-2006, 12:13 PM
option a doesnt make any sense. cut 6-7 hours out of the week, and add 3-4 to every day? that would be like going to school for an EXTRA day, thus having to pay the teachers MORE.

calebh
10-10-2006, 12:49 PM
umm... i would pick option 4. move. i really cant see much good coming out of any of those choices...