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View Full Version : Co2 or Nitrogen?


Bulletproof
07-26-2006, 05:26 AM
I have a pilot ACS and people keep telling me that my Co2 won't work if I shoot the gun fast? Is that true? and what are the benefits of having Co2 or Nitrogen?

vikingshadow
07-26-2006, 05:31 AM
No, it's not true. The only problems that can arise when shooting fast is that liquid Co2 might get in the gun and cause it to freeze up. If you anti-syphon your tank and get a regulator built for Co2, you won't have many problems.

Nitro (HPA or CA) is better in that it has a regulator built into the tank so you get some consistancy there. Also, it doesn't freeze up your gun, and no spikes in pressure, so each shot should be just like the last one. It tends to be somewhat cleaner, meaning it's easier on orings and other internals. It's more expensive to get started on HPA because you have to buy a tank, but after that, it's comparable to buying Co2, price-wise, that is!

skate_emerica
07-26-2006, 10:21 AM
Also if you plan on doing any tourniments Nitro is almost a must. Most fields allow around 250-290 fps and it differs at each field but they would have a set fps. Co2 will cause you to almost 4 outta 10 shots go over the set fps. Nitro will deffinatly keep you under the recommended fps and keep from you gettin deducted points.

EliteEagleX
07-26-2006, 08:30 PM
Let's put it this way, more easily stated than above.
C02: Freezes on Full-Auto so your gun might not recock automaticly, FPS can easily spike at times so your paint-balls won't always go the same distance.
Nitrogen: Never freezes (Same air that we breathe) No fps drops at all balls will always go the same amount of speed and distance no spikes.
So yes, Nitro is better however I still use C02 and have NO problem with it, I like it because it is CHEAP and works fine. If you had an Autococker\Angel\Automag etc I would strongly suggest Nitrogen, However C02 is fine with Spyders if you ask me as they do not have extremly fragile parts. The worst that C02 can do to your Spyder is possibly freeze your o-rings and make that snap... I haven't had that happen yet though and I do full-auto all the time! Biggest down-fall of Nitrogen is finding places to refill, and the cost of a tank.. and repairs ON the tank when something stops working (Gauge). Also if you have Nitrogen I strongly recommend a Regulator, with C02 I strongly recommend you DONT get a regulator (More O-rings to freeze) Expansion chambers are the best w\ C02.
Note: You can get your tank turned into a Anti-Siphon C02 Tank if you take it to your local airsmith however you will need to give them your gun too, Anti-Siphon C02 Tanks only give out gas if done correctly and NEVER release liquid :-) I'm to lazy to do that though..

vikingshadow
07-27-2006, 05:04 AM
Let's put it this way, more easily stated than above.
C02: Freezes on Full-Auto so your gun might not recock automaticly, FPS can easily spike at times so your paint-balls won't always go the same distance. Not always. As I said before, getting a regulator made for Co2 will prevent that from happening, along with anti-syphoning your tank.
Nitrogen: Never freezes (Same air that we breathe) No fps drops at all balls will always go the same amount of speed and distance no spikes.
So yes, Nitro is better however I still use C02 and have NO problem with it, I like it because it is CHEAP and works fine. If you had an Autococker\Angel\Automag etc I would strongly suggest Nitrogen, However C02 is fine with Spyders if you ask me as they do not have extremly fragile parts. The worst that C02 can do to your Spyder is possibly freeze your o-rings and make that snap... I haven't had that happen yet though and I do full-auto all the time! Biggest down-fall of Nitrogen is finding places to refill, and the cost of a tank.. and repairs ON the tank when something stops working (Gauge).
I agree with this, except that MOST guns above lower level guns will require you use Nitrogen due to the solenoid. Co2 is also a "dirty" gas meaning it'll require you to clean your internals frequently and it can gunk up things. More than just orings here.Not sure on the "repairs on the tank" since I've had two tanks for 3 years or more and haven't had to do a thing with them in the way of repairs.

Also if you have Nitrogen I strongly recommend a Regulator, with C02 I strongly recommend you DONT get a regulator (More O-rings to freeze) Expansion chambers are the best w\ C02.

Here's where we REALLY disagree. Xchambers bite the big one and are not worth the money you pay for them, in my opinion. They may give some extra time for the liquid to expand into a gas, but do absolutely NOTHING for for spikes in pressure, nor do they help your accuracy.

A regulator, specificially built for Co2, is the best thing you can get for any gun, but especially if you use Co2. It compresses the air, the same amount every time, which is let into your gun on a consistant basis, meaning you'll have the same pressure behind each ball which means the paint is going to go the same distance pretty much every time, which in theory should allow you to be much more consistant when shooting, ESPECIALLY at higher speeds.

You don't necessarily need another regulator on your gun if you use Nitrogen, especially on Spyders and the like, because the tank has a regulator already on it which releases the air at 800 - 850 psi into the gun. That's the exact pressure those guns need. Plus, you can buy tanks with adjustable regs that will release the air at whatever pressure you need it to be. However, most guns that require lower pressures will come with a regulator already, so you don't need to worry about that.

Personally, and I know most everyone here will agree with me, you're just wasting time and money with expansion chambers.

Note: You can get your tank turned into a Anti-Siphon C02 Tank if you take it to your local airsmith however you will need to give them your gun too, Anti-Siphon C02 Tanks only give out gas if done correctly and NEVER release liquid :-) I'm to lazy to do that though..

You can also buy the kits and do them yourself. It's not difficult at all, just make sure the curve of the tube points up, not down. However, if you don't feel safe doing it yourself, then an airsmith can do it for you pretty cheaply.

Bulletproof
07-27-2006, 05:20 AM
Thanks a lot guys