PDA

View Full Version : Hps


newkid
05-19-2006, 07:36 PM
why does it cost so much to get HPS tanks

colonel_moo
05-19-2006, 07:40 PM
you mean HPA (high pressured air)? its because the tanks need to withstand anywhere from 3000 to 5000 psi. to accomplish this, more expensive materials need to be used, such as carbon fiber, or fiberglass wrappings, and also a regulator needs to be added to regulate that 4500 psi or so down to 800 or 450. co2 tanks are cheap because they only need to withstand 900 psi, and dont need a reg at all.

pman15
05-19-2006, 07:40 PM
u mean hpa tanks if so hpa is high pressured air. it allows more shots from co2 tanks{depending on the size}it gives u better accuracy and it is more efficiant

vikingshadow
05-20-2006, 03:34 AM
u mean hpa tanks if so hpa is high pressured air. it allows more shots from co2 tanks{depending on the size}it gives u better accuracy and it is more efficiant

Hold on there, little buddy. Let's not be giving inaccurate or incomplete information to the masses!

It doesn't give more shots THAN Co2 tanks, and you can't use HPA IN a Co2 tank. Obviously, if you use a large HPA tank, you'll get more shots than a 9 oz Co2 tank, but I was getting 2000 (or more) shots off my 20 oz Co2 tank on my Spyder, and I can't get near that much with my 68/4500 tank on my other guns. The efficiency of a MARKER is where the shot count comes from. Not the tank.

Also, I don't think HPA gives better accuracy - it's different than Co2 in that it doesn't fluctuate as much in the different weather types which will keep the flow more even into your guns, so in that aspect, yes it HELPS you with achieving greater accuracy from shot to shot, but otherwise, it's still a matter of the gun.

As far as efficiency, as I stated above, is more a result of your gun, not your air.

As Moo said earlier, the tanks cost more due to the technology to allow for greater pressures and the different ways to build the tanks. Also, the regulator is a factor in that cost, since Co2 tanks don't have them built in. Also, the demand factor is there as well. People will pay that much for them, so they'll sell them for that much.

Hob Hayward
05-20-2006, 09:40 AM
Well the main cost of them is for the reg, is it not? Plus your buying a carbon fiber tank thats rated to 4500psi and I assume that has to cost somthing...

marvin-martian
05-20-2006, 09:54 AM
is there still a CF shortage?

colonel_moo
05-20-2006, 10:10 AM
im not sure about the shortage, but you guys are forgetting that most tanks dont even use carbon fiber. most are fiberglass, i donno why everybody thinks they are CF. the only true CF tanks are the dye throttle and the nitro duck tanks.

DRAGON
05-20-2006, 02:47 PM
Well the main cost of them is for the reg, is it not?

That is the main reason they cost more. There are tanks available not fiber wrapped but are a bit heavier. If you play, you pay, that's all there is to that -

pman15
05-20-2006, 02:59 PM
Hold on there, little buddy. Let's not be giving inaccurate or incomplete information to the masses!

It doesn't give more shots THAN Co2 tanks, and you can't use HPA IN a Co2 tank. Obviously, if you use a large HPA tank, you'll get more shots than a 9 oz Co2 tank, but I was getting 2000 (or more) shots off my 20 oz Co2 tank on my Spyder, and I can't get near that much with my 68/4500 tank on my other guns. The efficiency of a MARKER is where the shot count comes from. Not the tank.

Also, I don't think HPA gives better accuracy - it's different than Co2 in that it doesn't fluctuate as much in the different weather types which will keep the flow more even into your guns, so in that aspect, yes it HELPS you with achieving greater accuracy from shot to shot, but otherwise, it's still a matter of the gun.

As far as efficiency, as I stated above, is more a result of your gun, not your air.

As Moo said earlier, the tanks cost more due to the technology to allow for greater pressures and the different ways to build the tanks. Also, the regulator is a factor in that cost, since Co2 tanks don't have them built in. Also, the demand factor is there as well. People will pay that much for them, so they'll sell them for that much.

well my friend has a hpa tank and he said that it gives him better acurracy{hey im just listening to what he says though}

Team Ramrod
05-20-2006, 03:03 PM
thats the great thing about the internet, dont need to listen to the experienced people (even mods) when "My friend said it so its got to be true" :rolleyes:

Sandman_Bravo
05-21-2006, 07:54 AM
You got a point there Ramrod,lol! I have to say though, I tried HPA on my marker (before LP conversion) and it did seem to shoot straighter and more accurately. Now when I went to the chrono, it was close to300fps where as when using co2 it was all over from around 240-270fps. This increase in velocity could contribute to "more accuracy". HPA also operates your marker at much warmer temps with less fluctuations in pressure(as previously stated) that give better operating results. I can see where a person could percieve HPA to make their gun more accurate. I'm not disagreeing with everyone(who have more experience & knowledge than me) just giving my own experiences.

oldnewb
05-21-2006, 09:41 AM
So, in effect, HPA gives better shot to shot consistency in colder weather than CO2, thus resulting in better accuracy... in colder weather (say, like Canada????).

I can see what you say about higher fps resulting in higher accuracy, that's a given though.

marvin-martian
05-21-2006, 10:05 AM
HPA also allows you to shoot faster. CO2 has to convert from a liquid to a gas every shot, so if you try and shoot fast with it, theres a high possibility of getting liquid CO2 in your marker.

vikingshadow
05-21-2006, 11:41 AM
oldnewb - You're correct about the HPA and cold weather. You'll have better consistancy. However, on the second part of your statement, assuming higher velocity is over 300 fps, this doesn't result in better accuracy in most cases. Have you ever seen a gun shooting hot and the balls are flying everywhere? That's because the curves and dimples and dents in the spherical shape is interacting with air thus making it fly crazy (think a pitcher in baseball throwing a curve ball...) The paint may be "round," but it's far from perfectly round because of the seam around the paint.

A lot of "perceptions" that come with HPA (in my opinion) comes from the idea that the person getting it and using it for the first time is subjected to the mental "coolness" of having HPA, and a lot of the times, they think it's a cure-all for several other small issues. It may very well be, but not in the extremes that they percieve.

HPA DOES cause you to shoot a bit hotter than normal - I think it's due to higher pressure coming out of the bottle more consistantly, which results in you having to turn your reg down on your gun to make it legal, whereas the Co2 fluctuates as it warms and cools, causing some shots to be hotter and some to be shorter (especially in extreme weather conditions such as freezing weather or extremely hot days.) The resulting lower psi ends up making the shots straighter, so the perception is that HPA makes your gun more accurate.

At least that's my thoughts on the matter. Oh, and Marv is right about being able to shoot faster, which is much much safer for noids and such!