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jeffreyj1279
01-08-2008, 08:22 PM
Obviously i am posting so many questions because I just bought my MR2. But for the money, can i get some suggestions for CO2 setups that are cost friendly? Thanks again for all thy input!

SpyderMan723
01-09-2008, 02:39 PM
If you are using CO2 buy a 20 ounce tank if you havent already.
But you could switch to HPA(High Pressure Air). it'll cost a little more but its safer for your gun and its environmently friendly :)

jeffreyj1279
01-09-2008, 03:55 PM
I already have the CO2. What kind of air is the HPA? Aren't there nitrogen bottles out there?
Thanks for the help!

SpyderMan723
01-09-2008, 04:00 PM
someone correct me if im wrong but i think nitro and HPA is the same thing.
HPA is just normal air 02 compressed into a bottle

wylde01
01-09-2008, 05:58 PM
your right spyderman. they are the same basically but now days i dont think that you can find a shop that uses nitro. they all just use compressed air.

AutoSpyder
01-09-2008, 08:13 PM
If your gonna stick with CO2 you should invest in a good regulator like the Palmers Stabilizer, it basically gives you the same performance as you would get with HPA. They usually average around $130 new but you would probably spend that or more if you switch to HPA and buy a fancy tank AND regulator.

The Booth Man
01-10-2008, 08:33 PM
I just switched over to HPA last fall and found it to work much better in my markers than CO2. When I used co2 I had a Palmers Stabilizer. It worked really well in the summer, but when the temperature dropped below 40 degrees liquid co2 started pumping through the gun and ice would shoot out the barrel.

Here's the math:

20 oz co2 tank: $25 HPA 72 cubic inch @3000 psi: $80-100
Palmers Stabilizer: $75-125

Fills can also be cheaper for you with HPA in some places. I live in Helena, Montana and it costs me $2.50 to fill my HPA tank and $3 to fill my co2 tanks.

In short, you will actually save money if you invest in a HPA tank rather than co2 with a regulator.

AutoSpyder
01-10-2008, 08:47 PM
I live in Texas where even in the winter its usually above 50 degrees during the day so thats why I chose to stick with CO2 and HPA is hard to find in my area, so what Booth Man said makes alot of sense. So do your research before you make a final choice, it all depends on where you live and what is easier to find.

jeffreyj1279
01-10-2008, 09:18 PM
when you configure the MR2 with the palmer stabilizer, what kind of mods do you have to make? Do you have a pic of what it looks like? Thanks for all the help.

biofish
01-11-2008, 07:24 PM
Am I correct is saying you do NOT need a regulator with a HPA tank?...
I am switching to HPA and the tank i am buying just has the Air Pressure indicator on the tank.

kramernator
01-11-2008, 07:30 PM
Originally posted by biofish
[url]Am I correct is saying you do NOT need a regulator with a HPA tank?...

yes, i believe you are right but it would be much better if you did use a reg

wylde01
01-12-2008, 06:25 AM
i dont use a reg with my HPA tank and everything is fine. that just cost more money then whats actually needed to be spent.

biofish
01-12-2008, 11:08 AM
Thanks!... i will probably end up buying a reg down the road when i have everything else where i want it on my gun.. I appricate your responses.
i dont use a reg with my HPA tank and everything is fine. that just cost more money then whats actually needed to be spent.

The Booth Man
01-12-2008, 02:14 PM
yes, i believe you are right but it would be much better if you did use a reg


HPA tanks have a regulator built in to the tank. There is no need for a second regulator unless your marker operates below 850 psi

biofish
01-12-2008, 04:38 PM
Wow.. didn't know that.. Thanks for your input!
HPA tanks have a regulator built in to the tank. There is no need for a second regulator unless your marker operates below 850 psi

AutoSpyder
01-13-2008, 07:55 AM
To run the Stabilizer you have two options one using a female stabilizer and the other using a male stabilizer. I used a male stabilizer with a macro line kit since its more common and less expensive. To install it first remove the lower shroud that covers the air line. Then you can unscrew the part the air line attaches to. This leaves you with a standard ASA inlet and then you just screw in the male stabilizer and hook it up to the bottom line ASA using the macro line kit.http://img353.imageshack.us/img353/7646/photo0010su4.jpg