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DFSniper
12-23-2007, 08:58 AM
ok, so i got into an argument on PBN with a guy on how the weight of a paintball affects your shooting.

a heavier ball will shoot further because it has more mass. but since its heavier than your standard paintball, won't you need to increase the pressure in order get it to shoot at the same muzzle velocity? and if you didnt increase the pressure, the lighter ball would shoot further, right?

The Pumper
12-23-2007, 09:00 AM
The heavier the object, the more pressure you need to put on it to make it shoot farther. And yes if you didnt increase pressure the lighter ball would shoot farther.

Its more common sense than a physics question. :p

I'm taking physics general and we dont do any of this stuff.

HelpDeskHustler
12-23-2007, 09:05 AM
generally they both fly the same distance, since any difference would be negligible, but if you'd like we could do all of the math.

DFSniper
12-23-2007, 09:11 AM
pumper, thats what i thought (among other things) but people were throwing all these things at me, and i had a mental breakdown. i decided not to think about it for a while. and then i came up with all these different physics problems, and a few i actually proved myself wrong right before i posted. for some reason i was thinking that a lighter object would have a steeper drop-off, but would be able to maintain its horizontal velocity longer :confused:

i took intro to physics my senior year (last year) and we covered all the mechanical physics (torque, velocity, acceleration, gravity, buoyancy, etc.) along with light and electricity.

Hossy
12-23-2007, 11:17 AM
pumper, thats what i thought (among other things) but people were throwing all these things at me, and i had a mental breakdown. i decided not to think about it for a while. and then i came up with all these different physics problems, and a few i actually proved myself wrong right before i posted. for some reason i was thinking that a lighter object would have a steeper drop-off, but would be able to maintain its horizontal velocity longer :confused:

i took intro to physics my senior year (last year) and we covered all the mechanical physics (torque, velocity, acceleration, gravity, buoyancy, etc.) along with light and electricity.

I took Physics Freshman year. I dont remember much, but this is what id think:

The heavier ball would need more to get started. The lighter ball may shoot
at 280 while the heavier ball would shoot at 275. (im just making up numbers). So with this known, If both balls would shoot at 280, the heavier ball would go farther because it would take more force over time to take the ball down than the lighter ball, and the lighter ball could fly all over the place depending on other pressures it could come in touch with. Both balls would have very close potential energy, but the heavier one would need more Kenetic energy to get the ball rollin out of the barrel.

Sorry if thats wrong, I may have gotten a few things wrong in Physics, it wasnt my best class.

HelpDeskHustler
12-23-2007, 12:57 PM
I would say all variables would generally equal out and they'd both shoot as far, unless you exerted spin on the ball in which case the heavier would be harder to stop.

leed
12-23-2007, 02:54 PM
The problem here, is that there is air resistance, so ideally, the lighter ball will fall short at the same muzzle velocity.

oldironmudder
12-23-2007, 03:34 PM
Aint the average ball weight like 3.6grams?

HelpDeskHustler
12-23-2007, 07:56 PM
The problem here, is that there is air resistance, so ideally, the lighter ball will fall short at the same muzzle velocity.
that's actually right. since the ball is projected at ~300fps either way and a constant force isn't applied, the heavy ball will have more momentum and will take more resistance to slow down. The fly time will be the same, but the deceleration will be greater on the lighter ball.

DFSniper
12-23-2007, 08:07 PM
right, i figured that part out earlier before i made the first post. like i said:
"a heavier ball will shoot further because it has more mass."

HelpDeskHustler
12-24-2007, 10:09 AM
it would be an extremely negligible difference since the ball mass generally doesn't change by more than a few grams